Man checking lawn mower blades

Lawn Mower Sputters When Blades Are Engaged – This could be the issue

A common problem with lawn mowers is that they sputter when the blades are engaged. If this happens, there may be a number of reasons for it.

The most common reason why your lawn mower sputters when the blades are engaged is that the blades are not sharp enough and need to be replaced.

Another possibility is that there is too much grass or debris build-up on the blades, which can cause them to become bogged down and sputter.

Finally, it’s also possible that there is an issue with the engine and it needs to be serviced.

In the rest of this article I am going to explore further some common reasons for the sputtering and fixes.

When the blades are engaged the lawn mower sputters – what could be wrong?

There are a few things that could be wrong. One possibility is that the blades are not sharp enough, and as a result, they are not cutting the grass properly.

Another possibility is that there is something caught in the blades, which is causing them to jam.

Finally, it’s also possible that there is something wrong with the engine, and it’s not providing enough power to move the blades properly.

Let’s go over some other possible issues individually.

Dirty air filter

A dirty air filter can make the lawn mower sputter because it won’t be able to breathe well.

For that reason you should always make sure to keep a clean air filter in your lawn mower.

Low gas or oil

When the lawn mower doesn’t have enough gas or oil, it might sputter. This is because it can’t move properly when it doesn’t have enough power.

As a result, you should always make sure that your lawn mower has enough gas or oil before you start using it.

Bad spark plug

A bad spark plug can also cause the lawn mower to sputter because it won’t be able to create a spark.

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As a result, the engine won’t be able to run properly.

It’s important to note that a bad spark plug can also cause the engine to overheat, so you should always make sure to replace it as soon as possible.

Dirty blades

If the blades are dirty, they might not be able to cut the grass properly. As a result, the lawn mower will have to work harder, and it might start to sputter.

To avoid this, you should always make sure to clean the blades after each use.

Jammed blades

If the blades are jammed, they won’t be able to move properly. This will cause the lawn mower to sputter because it can’t move the blades.

To fix this, you should turn off the lawn mower and then clear the blades. You can do this by using a screwdriver or a brush. Once the blades are clear, you should be able to resume mowing.

Engine Problem

If there is something wrong with the engine, it might not be providing enough power to move the blades. As a result, the lawn mower will start to sputter.

If you think that there is something wrong with the engine, you should take it to a mechanic to have it checked out.

These are some of the possible reasons why the lawn mower might sputter when the blades are engaged. If you’re still having trouble, you should take it to a mechanic to have it checked out.

Make sure to keep all parts of the lawn mower clean and well-maintained

It’s summertime, and that means it’s time to get the lawn mowed! But what do you do if your lawn mower starts sputtering when you try to engage the blades? Here are a few tips to help get your lawn mower running smoothly again.

  • Clean the blades and the underside of the deck. Grass and dirt can build up on both surfaces and cause the mower to sputter. Make sure to clean off any old oil or gas as well, as this can also cause problems.
  • Check the air filter. If it’s dirty, replace it. A dirty air filter will decrease airflow and make the engine work harder, which can lead to sputtering.
  • Make sure there are no kinks in the fuel line. If there is even a slight bend or obstruction in the line, it can prevent gas from reaching the engine and cause sputtering.
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If you’re still having problems after trying these tips, it may be time to take your lawn mower into a repair shop for professional assistance.

As you can see, there are several steps that you can take if your lawn mower starts sputtering when you engage the blades.

By cleaning off any build-up of dirt and grass, replacing a dirty air filter, and checking for obstructions or bends in the fuel line, you should be able to get your mower running smoothly again in no time.

Store the lawn mower in a safe place when it’s not in use

It’s frustrating when your lawn mower sputters and won’t start when you engage the blades.

You know it needs gas, so you add more, but still nothing. You try to pull the cord again and again, but it just won’t turn over no matter what you do.

The problem might be that the blades are getting too much resistance from the grass.

When this happens, the engine can’t turn them over and it will sputter as a result. One way to prevent this is to store the lawn mower in a safe place when it’s not in use.

This will keep the blades from getting bogged down with grass and hopefully solve your starting problems.

Check the oil level – it may be low and need to be filled

Make sure the oil level is correct

If it’s low, fill it up with the right type of oil for your lawn mower.

Also, check the air filter. If it’s dirty or clogged, clean or replace it.

Check the spark plug. If it’s dirty or damaged, replace it. Finally, make sure the blades are sharp – if they’re dull, sharpen them or replace them.

If none of these things seem to be the problem, you may need to take your lawn mower into a repair shop or call a local mechanic for help.

Whatever the issue is, don’t delay in fixing it – a sputtering lawn mower can quickly turn into an expensive problem that could have been prevented with regular maintenance.

Make sure the gas tank is full

One of the most common causes of this problem is that the gas tank isn’t full. Make sure it’s at least half-full before attempting to mow your lawn. If that doesn’t work, you may need to clean or replace the air filter.

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If you’ve tried both of those things and the lawn mower still sputters when you engage the blades, it may be time to take it in for repairs.

Clean the blades of the lawn mower – they may be clogged with dirt or grass

One possibility is that the blades are clogged with dirt or grass. In order to get your mower running properly again, you’ll need to clean them off. Here’s how:

  • 1) Disconnect the spark plug wire from the spark plug. This will prevent the engine from starting accidentally while you’re cleaning it.
  • 2) Remove the blade cover – usually there are several screws holding it in place.
  • 3) Carefully clean off any dirt or grass that has accumulated on the blades.
  • 4) Reattach the blade cover and plug in your mower’s spark plug wire.

If you find that your lawn mower still sputters when you engage the blades, it may be time to take it in for professional servicing. But until then, using these simple steps should help keep your lawn looking beautiful.

With a bit of effort, you can get your lawn mower running smoothly again. Just follow these simple steps to clean off any dirt or grass from the blades, and then reattach the blade cover and reconnect the spark plug wire.

If this doesn’t solve the problem, however, you may need to take your mower in for professional servicing.

Tighten any loose screws or bolts on the lawn mower

You may have a loose screw or bolt that’s causing the problem. Tighten any screws or bolts that seem to be loose, and try starting the lawn mower again. This might well fix the problem.

If your lawn mower is sputtering when you engage the blades, there may be an issue with one of the parts or components on your machine.

One possible cause could be a loose screw or bolt. To fix this issue, start by checking all of the screws and bolts on your lawn mower to make sure they are tightly secured.

If one seems loose, tighten it up and try again to see if that fixes the problem.

If not, there could be something else going on, such as a problem with the carburetor, spark plug, or air filter.

If neither of our advice above has helped you figure out the problem you need to take your lawn mower to a professional for further diagnosis.